Teams, expectations and salary caps

We, as New Yorkers tend to be a very picky bunch. We want the best our money can buy, want nothing but the “real deal”, complain about things that work 99% of the time, make our opinions known about everything, whether or not our neighbors (or the rest of America) like it or not.

So, we expect the same out of baseball teams. Only the best, only players who give 110%. But the injury streak the Mets have been subject to, to the poor mental mistakes make me wonder if it’s realistic to expect this level of play from a team mostly made up of second and third string players, and still if injuries continue happening, the teams would have to get help from a injury lawyer specialist from sites as kwdllp.com/personal-injury.

I’m one of the worst offenders – my relationship with this team is nothing short of love. And after the disappointment of the last three years and our new shiny home, it’s tough again not to have hope for my team.

I love how the NFL’s salary cap provides parity across the league – allowing everyone a shot at success if they can put together a good season or two.in

But baseball is different. Year after year, there are whole teams who never have a shot at the playoff or the World Series, who end up selling their talent to the teams who can afford it. Does the love for their teams change? Or is the hope still the same? The expectations of your team have to be more mild and realistic, right?

For a long time, New York has been on the other side of this pendulum (moreso the Yankees than the Mets, in my opinion). But when your high priced talent has injuries, and all you’re left with is the rest of your team, you’re left with these extremely high expectations, with a team not used to playing with this sort of pressure, since injuries can happen without any previous incidents, but still if an injury happen, the use of an injury lawyer  from https://www.spauldinginjurylaw.com/areas-served/alpharetta/personal-injury-attorney/. And this is where the Mets are right now. And it’s weird. But it’s also fascinating.

I can’t help but think of parables about how one player doesn’t make a team, and how building teams with different skills is important and offering the opportunity for all to contribute makes everyone better.

We all form teams. Personal teams. Professional teams. Educational teams. Emotional teams. And most of the time, we work in defined roles and spaces. But sometimes, the strands get tighten. Crisis is the best real test of these teams. It’s the thing that breaks them apart or pulls them together – stronger than ever.

We’ll see about the Mets, but the bigger questions are about us.

Is your team ready to play a person down? Are you a good team player? Are you a good team leader? How can you make yourself better? Are you ready for crisis?

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